USA

Disclaimers:

  • These charts are NOT meant to be taken as an absolute or definitive display of ethnic origins for modernday populations!
  • Ethnic labels given by Europeans do NOT per se reflect how the slaves would have self-identified themselves! (see this article for more discussion)
  • Take note of the sample size, time period, region and any other details given to familiarize yourself with the CONTEXT of the data!
  • Even if limited in scope, valuable information can still be obtained if you look for the patterns!
  • Sorry for all the exclamation marks 😉 It’s just that i’ve seen these kind of charts being misinterpreted so many times, not only online but also by trained historians. Which is a shame really because misleading conclusions can easily be avoided if you just take these charts for what they are: sample based data which might provide us with extra clues about the ethnic composition of Africans being taken to the USA during a given time period and for a given place/region. All depending on how representative the samples might have been.

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Regional Origins

Trans Atlantic Slave Voyages (Inter-Colonial & Domestic Slave Trade not included!)
For more details read  “African American AncestryDNA Results

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EltisUSA99_zps95858018

Source: Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database (2010 Estimates) (http://www.slavevoyages.org)

 

 

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Source: “Exchanging Our Country Marks: The Transformation of African Identities in the Colonial and Antebellum South”, (Michael Gomez, 1998).

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Trans Atlantic Slave Voyages & Inter-Colonial Slave Trade (via West Indies)
For more details read   “Benin/Togo region

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Intercolonial trade (O Malley 2009)

Source:”Beyond the Middle Passage: Slave Migration from the Caribbean to North America, 1619-1807″, : (G. O’Malley, 2009), The William and Mary Quarterly, 66, (1), 125-172.

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Gullah

Linguistic influences from Africa
For more details read “Comparing the Gullah language with other English-based Creoles

English Creole Lexicon

From “Out of Africa: African Influences in Atlantic Creoles” (Parkvall, 2000)

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Perosnal Names (Turner 1949) (p.142)

From “Out of Africa: African Influences in Atlantic Creoles” (Parkvall, 2000)

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Tabel 16 Words in Gullah language derived from Afrcan languages

From “The Gullah People and Their African Heritage” (Pollitzer, 1999)

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Tabel 17 African influence on Grammar, Sounds etc.

From “The Gullah People and Their African Heritage” (Pollitzer, 1999)

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Figure 2 , slave trade numbers versus ling. influence

From “The Gullah People and Their African Heritage” (Pollitzer, 1999)

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Louisiana

Louisiana Slave Database (1719-1820)
For more details read  “Louisiana: most African diversity within the United States?

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***New Orleans Baptism Database 1796-1803

KD Roberts 2003 - Ethnic breakdown Baptized Slaves St Louis Cathedral 1796-1803

Source: “Slaves and Slavery in Louisiana – The Evolution of Atlantic World Identities, 1791-1831” (Roberts, 2003)

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South Carolina

Runaway slaves 1730-1790
For more details read  “Ethnic Origins of South Carolina Runaway Slaves

African Origins of SC runaway slaves2

Pollitzer (1999, p.60)

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Virginia

Bight of Biafra ancestry
For more details read  “The Igbo Connection for Virginia & Virginia-Descendants

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TAST (VA, SC, percentages)

Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database (2010) (http://www.slavevoyages.org/)

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TAST (VA genderratio)

Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database (2010) (http://www.slavevoyages.org/)

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Final Passages (Percentage West Indian imports VA,1701-1765)

Taken from “Final Passages: The Intercolonial Slave Trade of British America, 1619-1807″ (O’Malley, 2014)

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7 thoughts on “USA

  1. Hi,

    Didn’t you have a table from slavevoyages.com with the countries of slaves origin in the different states like Pennsylvania, New York, Georgia and others

    Like

  2. G’day
    I have ancestors from England and Africa. They met & bred on St Kitts. (Slave/ planter.)
    My DNA says iberian peninsula, congo.
    How / where do I search for the likely source / departure point of my slave ancestor?
    We are talking arrival mid/ late 1700s to early 1800s.
    Ive been at this for a while but am going crazy with so much info, not applicable.
    Thanks
    Barb

    Like

  3. Hey FonteFelipe. I was wondering if you could give me a little insight into my results. I’ve been reading your site for a while now and just wanted to have your opinion what I’ve found. I’m a AA which I can confirm that my family is from South Carolina, USA but I think I have at least partial Hausa/Fulani background. My highest results are Nigeria = 38% Senegal + Mali 19% and Ireland + Great Britain + Europe West = 16%.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi AJ,

      AncestryDNA’s socalled “Ethnicty Estimates” can provide very valuable insight but only within a (sketchy) regional framework. You will need additional context/info to pinpoint any specific ethnic details or also combine with other DNA results, especially any African matches you might have. Therefore I would advise you to systematically look into your matches first of all:

      https://tracingafricanroots.wordpress.com/2017/05/10/how-to-find-those-elusive-african-dna-matches-on-ancestry-com/

      From having seen the African matches of more than 50 African Americans already and also based on my review of historically documented ethnic references of African captives in the US i would say that the odds of having any Fula and Nigerian Igbo lineage are much greater than having any Hausa lineage. But again you will need additional clues to confirm.

      The striking thing about your breakdown is of course the 38% “Nigeria” ! This gives your breakdown a more pronounced regional focus than the usually more fragmented standard. However i did observe similar high scores for the “Nigeria” region among my African American sample group (n=350). As it seems to be quite common even despite individual variation. For more details see:

      https://tracingafricanroots.wordpress.com/ancestrydna/african-american-results/

      Like

      • Okay I can list the entire list of results. I’ve traced one distant relative who is a Jalloh from Senegal. I’ve spoken with many Fula from Guinea who verified that Jalloh is a Fulani last name. That was the only semi-concrete evidence that I could find to support my findings.

        Nigeria – 38
        Senegal – 17
        Benin/Togo – 11
        Ireland – 9
        Cameroon – 7
        Europe West – 5
        Ivory Coast/Ghana – 3
        South Eastern Bantu – 2
        South Central Hunter Gatherers – 2
        Great Britain – 2
        Mali – 2
        North Africa – 1
        Less than 1 trace amounts of Native American and Asia Central

        GedMatch – EthioHelix + French (Proxy for European)
        West-Africa 46.32
        Eastern-Bantu 14.86
        French 13.41
        North-Africa 8.48
        Nilo-Saharan 3.98
        Mbuti-Pygmy 3.73
        Omotic 3.42
        Biaka-Pygmy 3.08
        Khoi-San 2.71

        Liked by 1 person

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