About me

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Getting to the roots of the most famous tree on Cape Verde, “Pe di Polon”. It’s a socalled Kapok or Coton tree, to be found in both West Africa as well as the Americas. Sort of symbolizing the Trans Atlantic connections of Cape Verde.

This blog was basically born out of my personal quest to explore my own African roots. I took the 23andme DNA test already in 2010. Initially I was merely told that I had an x amount of African ancestry, without further specification. Of course I already knew I had African DNA as I am of Cape Verdean descent with Cape Verde being a West African island group (see also “What Tribe Am I?” ). I was also told that my maternal lineage originated in Mozambique out of all places! An African country which is probably furthest removed from Cape Verde  geographically speaking, located right at the other end of the continent, thousands of miles away from Cape Verde. With little known documented ancestral connections between the two countries besides both having been part of the Portuguese colonial empire. Safe to say i was confused and clueless about this one single concrete hint provided about my African heritage!

While overall my 23andme test experience has been enriching in many ways and i gained more insights after subsequent updates of my results. It did leave me wanting to know more about exactly which regions and which ethnic groups would be connected with my African heritage, beyond Cape Verde obviously. That sort of got the ball rolling as i tried to find more information myself from reading up on both Cape Verdean and African Diasporic history as well as following online discussions on genetics and DNA testing. I’ll never claim to be a trained expert in either field but i will attempt to use my blog to share whatever knowledge i have gathered in the last 5 years after having taken my first DNA test. I still love reading about anything that’s related to personal DNA testing. There’s so many areas of interest that come together: history, genealogy, anthropology, population genetics and even the psychology of how people react to their results as it confronts them with how they self-identify I suppose. I can honestly say it never bores me.

I’m convinced that new insights are often generated by just putting two and two together. In other words I think a multidisciplinary approach, combining history, ethnography, linguistics etc. with genetics, often works better than just limiting yourself to a onesided view. I’m also a firm believer of democratizing knowledge. Despite much academic progress being made in African & Afro-Diasporic studies many people taking DNA tests seem to be not aware. So that’s why aside from posting on whatever captures my imagination, i also intend for this blog to be some sort of repository of useful links, resources, charts, maps etc. (navigate the menubar). Anything to make it easier to understand the ethnic origins of Afro-Diasporans from all over the Americas and even located within Africa 😉 I would advise anyone to familiarize themselves at the very least with the vast diversity of Africa (see ethno-linguistic maps) and also whatever’s been documented historically about the African ethnic groups being present in your own country (e.g. see  ethnic/regional charts for the USA or the Anglo-Caribbean among others).

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At the roots of probably the oldest and biggest tree of Cape Verde “Pe di Polon”. Standing tall for over 500 years on Santiago island.

Tracing the African roots of the Afro-Diaspora is also about reaffirming the lost identities of ancestors who were caught up in the most dehumanizing circumstances of slavery. I personally strongly believe that in order to truly honour your many dozens or even hundreds of African born forefathers and foremothers (see “Fictional Family Tree incl. African Born Ancestors“) taking a critical stance regarding the claims of DNA testing is a must. Naively taking your results at face value and just going for quick and easy answers could very well lead to gravely misidentifying the main lineages of your African ancestry, which would be tragic indeed inspite of all good intentions.

Don’t get me wrong: you can still get very valuable clues about your ancestry from DNA testing! But much depends on how much time and effort you’re willing to spend to do some own research, getting to know the basics of DNA testing, finding out about population genetics, learning about African history (again taking a critical stance and not just going by whatever seems either mainstream or fanciful but only what’s backed up by solid evidence). All these things will help improve your understanding and interpretation of your DNA test results which do provide helpful clues as long as you’ve done your homework.

Finding out about your ancestry can often be very daunting indeed. It takes a lot of perseverance, patience and luck. But I’ve found that when you finally get to learn something meaningful and verifiable it’s also very gratifying. Finding out you’re not alone in this quest is a true comfort and engaging in online discussions about this topic has always been very enriching for me and a great learning process. I invite all readers of this blog therefore to feel free to post any comments, questions, remarks or helpful criticism!

Just as a last statement i would like to emphasize it’s not my intention to push anyone’s own research into one direction only as it’s always wise to keep all options open. Even when the most plausible scenario usually is closest to the truth. Also i would hate to give any impression of a Mr.Know It All as i know how annoying that can be 😀 I’m aiming to keep opinions separate from facts and i will mention my sources as much as possible. I will also always make a conscious attempt to be as unbiased as I can be. However given human nature some bias might still be there even unintentionally. That’s why all the main research findings featured in my blog posts can also be found in “Ethnic/Regional Origins” in the menubar. That way readers can access the information without having to bother with my subjective opinions or attempts at (over) lenghty analysis 😉

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Dragoeiro tree in Santo Antão. It’s one of the most distinctive tree species on the Cape Verde islands.

20 gedachten over “About me

  1. Awesome! I just ordered my ancestrydna kit and hopefully in 6-8 weeks I can contribute to your site. I am excited, since I am from Brazil, and my great grandparents are from somewhere in Africa. Because of the Atlantic Trade, little is know about my family past. But now I want to put some light on it.

    Liked by 1 persoon

    • Muito obrigado Michel! I would love to include your results into my AncestryDNA survey. I have been wanting to see Brazilian results for a long time! Fortunately more Brazilians are taking the test right now. I will be excited with you when you receive your results, especially given your relatively recent connection with Africa!

      Like

      • These are my results and mtDNA haplotype. I would really like your opinion because there is very little information for L2c3 except some say “Gullah” and some say “Cape Verde.” My Ancestry results are:

        Africa 89%
        Cameroon/Congo 30%
        Benin/Togo 22%
        Ivory Coast/Ghana 17%
        Mali 10%
        Nigeria 6%
        Low Confidence Region
        Senegal 2%
        Africa North 1%
        Africa South-Central Hunter-Gatherers < 1%
        Other Regions Tested
        Africa Southeastern Bantu 0%

        However, A full sequence mtDNA test from FTDNA said:

        mtDNA – Haplogroup Origins

        HVR1 MATCHES
        Haplogroup Country Comment Match Total
        L2c France – 1
        L2c Germany – 1
        L2c Jamaica – 1
        L2c Mali – 2
        L2c Mexico – 2
        L2c Portugal – 3
        L2c Puerto Rico – 4
        L2c Senegal – 2
        L2c Sierra Leone – 2
        L2c Spain 1
        L2c Spain – 3
        L2c Suriname MDKO: Surinam 1
        L2c United States – 5
        L2c United States (Native American) – 4
        L2c Wales – 1
        L2c3 Cuba – 1
        L2c3 Guinea – 1
        L2c3 Jamaica – 2
        L2c3 United States – 4
        L2c3 United States (Native American) – 1

        HVR1 AND HVR2 MATCHES
        Haplogroup Country Comment Match Total
        L2c United States – 1
        L2c3 Cuba – 1
        L2c3 United States – 2
        HVR1, HVR2, AND CODING REGION MATCHES

        GENETIC DISTANCE – 1
        Haplogroup Country Comment Count
        L2c3 Cuba – 1
        L2c3 United States – 2

        AND: mtDNA – Ancestral Origins

        HVR1 MATCHES
        Country Match Total Country Total Percentage Comment
        Cuba 1 238 0.4%
        France 1 4,838 < 0.1 %
        Germany 1 15,154 < 0.1 %
        Guinea 1 10 N/A
        Jamaica 3 106 2.8%
        Mali 2 9 N/A
        Mexico 2 2,339 0.1%
        Portugal 3 1,141 0.3%
        Puerto Rico 4 799 0.5%
        Senegal 2 17 N/A
        Sierra Leone 2 39 N/A
        Spain 4 2,347 0.2%
        Suriname 1 8 N/A MDKO: Surinam (1)
        United States 9 6,483 0.1%
        United States (Native American) 5 3,979 0.1%
        Wales 1 1,284 0.1%

        HVR1 AND HVR2 MATCHES
        Country Match Total Country Total Percentage Comment
        Cuba 1 160 0.6%
        United States 3 5,951 < 0.1 %

        HVR1, HVR2, AND CODING REGION MATCHES

        GENETIC DISTANCE -1
        Country Match Total Country Total Percentage Comments
        Cuba 1 97 N/A
        United States 2 4732 < 0.1 %

        Like

  2. A breathtakingly sacrificial undertaking and most useful resource. Thanks for sharing your findings. As a fellow family-tree recorder and researcher, your work in this area has opened up new avenues of finding relatives who were previously lost due to dead ends and lack of information. Much respect.

    ~ Yejide AKA Carriacou’s Great-granddaughter in exile by way of T&T

    Liked by 1 persoon

  3. Hey, I just found this blog. I am so happy to see this. I have been always wondering what is behind my heritage. My parents are unsure, my grandma said something about Trinidad one time, but nothing else. I’m broke, so I’ve had to go on feelings and connections I feel to certain things. I feel connected to Haiti and it’s soil. I feel that coursing through me and my soul. But I don’t know. My next major purchase for myself is going to be a 23andme full test. I feel as though I’m going to trace my lineage and see that I’m from many more places than I thought. I’m kind of excited for this.

    ❤ This fills in the gaps until I can get there. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 persoon

  4. Hi my name is simone f. my ancestry dna results are: 29% nigerian 26% ivorycoast/ ghana 19% cameroon congo and 5% benin togo what tribe am i from please tell me

    Like

    • Hi Simone. I cannot tell you which ethnic group*s* you descend from because despite the name AncestryDNA’s socalled Ethnicity Estimates are not meant to give you that information. Instead they are intended to provide you with an approximate description of what your African DNA looks like regionally speaking, nothing more but also nothing less. This information can still be very valuable as long as you are aware of its inherent limitations and know how to correctly interpret these results.

      This type of socalled admixture analysis (incl. Ged-Match and DNA-Land) can never tell you exactly which ethnic group*s* you descend from with 100% certainty no matter how detailed their reports might look and also no matter how fancy or trustworthy their claims might appear at first. Keep in mind these tests are only measuring genetic similarity with samples in their (by default limited) database and not actual descent!

      I used a plural for ethnic group*s* on purpose as practically all Afro-Diasporans will have dozens if not hundreds of relocated African-born ancestors, depending on your background mostly from the 1700’s but also possibly from the 1500’s/1600’s and early 1800’s.

      Statistically speaking it is nearly impossible for all those people to have been from just 1 or even just a handful of ethnic groups. Instead on average a Diasporan will have various ethnic origins from several places in between Senegal and Mozambique. The particular mix and proportions will vary per individual but not so the fact that a Diasporan’s DNA is basically a melting pot of many different ethnic lineages. It will never reflect just one single ancestral “tribe”.

      Your best bet to confirm one particular ethnic lineage (out of many others) is by finding an African DNA cousin with confirmed background. Although going back several generations in fact also your DNA match might be ethnically mixed. So making any final conclusions about your MRCA (most recent common ancestor) should always be done cautiously. In order to do so, carefully & regularly browse through your DNA matches pages and look for “African” names or else persons who only have African regions mentioned in their ethnicity preview. You can also perform a search on birth location and type in various African country names such as Nigeria, Ghana, Liberia etc.

      Another strategy is to closely study the documented African presence for the US states where your family hails from. Not just going back 2 or 3 generations but rather going back as far as possible to the early 1800’s, or ideally even the 1700’s. Slavevoyage data as well as comparison with the African ethnic groups documented elsewhere can be very helpful when interpreted correctly. Although probably more so on a group level than on an individual basis.

      Having said all that your breakdown seems very typical for an African American. Especially the ranking of your top 4 regions is perfectly in line with what i found in my survey of 350 African American AncestryDNA results. If you are indeed African American statistically speaking the the odds will be high that you have some degree of Igbo lineage included in your “Nigeria” score although in fact other (southern) Nigerian ethnic groups might be included as well (in addition). Your socalled “Ivory Coast/Ghana” score will most likely include some degree of Akan lineage but possibly also some Liberian and Sierra Leonean lineage might be included (in addition). The socalled “Cameroon/Congo” region is more difficult to pinpoint but will probably include some degree of Bakongo lineage (in addition to possibly other Central African & Bight of Biafra lineage). This is all merely informed speculation on my part though 😉

      For more background information see also these previous blogs i have written on these topics:

      “What Tribe Am I?”
      Fictional Family Tree incl. African Born Ancestors
      Historically documented ethnic/regional origins of African Americans
      350 African American AncestryDNA results

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  5. My AncestryDNA results show that I am 72% African with the following breakdown: 22% Southeastern Africa Bantu, 13% Mali, 12% Benin and Togo, 9% Nigeria, 8% Ivory Coast/Ghana. Trace regions: 5% cameroon and Congo, 2% Hunter gatherers and 1% Senegal. I also have 27% European. I’m African American and I was surprised by the high SE Bantu percentage. Thoughts?

    Liked by 1 persoon

    • Hello Jo,

      Your socalled Southeastern Bantu score of 22% is indeed clearly above average and it’s quite rare for an AA to have it reported as top region. In my original survey of 350 AA results, the greatest amount of SE Bantu was “only” 25% and only two persons had this region as the biggest one within their African breakdown. Since then i have literally seen hundreds more of AA AncestryDNA results and again only a very small number have SE Bantu as number 1 region and typically the scores are rather subdued, with the higher ones only reaching the lower 20% range similar to you. However i did see one AA result with an astonishing score of 48% SE Bantu and also one with 33% SE Bantu. So i suppose it’s fair to say a SE Bantu score of above 25% is very atypical although not impossible for an AA.

      Now it gets more trickier to establish any likely origin hiding behind this socalled SE Bantu region, which is spread out across a very great part of Africa. Generally speaking for AA’s and other Afro-Diasporans i think that despite the labeling SE Bantu is most likely to be indicative of Southwestern Bantu origins, especially from Angola, eventhough origins from Southeastern Africa, especially Mozambique & Madagascar still also remain a possibility.

      I suppose only additional clues might clarify this for you. Especially DNA matches hailing from this general area. Have you done a thorough check yet for any African DNA cousins among your list of DNA matches? You can either carefully browse through each of your pages and look for matches which seem “African” because of their profile names or the preview of their ethnicity estmates being 100% African. Another way is to search for birth location and type in countries like Angola, Gabon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Zambia, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Nigeria, Ghana, Liberia etc. etc. The number of Africans who are taking AncestryDNA tests is small but steadily growing. So the chances of eventually finding an African match will increase with time. Keep in mind though that finding an African match doesn’t per se mean you or your MRCA (most recent common ancestor) share the same ethnic origin as your match. Without any paper trail there will always be several ancestral scenarios which may be valid.

      I intend to blog about this in greater detail eventually. But you can already read some more on this page:

      Central and Southern African AncestryDNA results

      Like

  6. Hello, My name is Cedric Ngwa. I am from Chicago, but my parents are originally from Northwest region of Cameroon, west/central africa. My tribes are Bafut/Mankon/Aghem and possibly Widikum from the Northwest Region. However I am a majority Bafut, and that’s how culturally I am identified. There are theories that my tribe I’d an offshoot of the Tikar from Northern nigeria or around the Lake Chad region. I wanted to know if you can help me to determine the validity of the oral history of my tribe through dna studies. Do you know if it’s possible to determine tribes through Dna? Thanks

    Liked by 1 persoon

    • Hello Cedric,

      Many people like you seek to find very finegrained DNA test results which specify ethnic origins. To be frank i i am always very sceptical about any DNA testing company which makes such claims as i suspect they are often merely catering to unrealistic wishes from their customers. I find that is often underestimated that ethnicity itself is a social construct, to a certain degree. It is not transfixed in time but rather gradually evolves, socalled ethnogenesis. Due to intermarriage across the generations with neighbouring ethnic groups as well as migrations from other areas any given ethnic group will usually be of “mixed” orgins if you go back long enough in time. Many ethnic groups in Africa actually show more genetic diversity among themselves rather than compared with neighbouring ethnic groups. This is because of their shared ancestral origins to be traced back to both recent historical periods as well as very ancient prehistory.

      Furthermore i find that many people underestimate the sheer number of ancestors we all have going back just a few generations. We are all aware we have 2 parents and 4 grandparents however we also have 8 great-grandparents, 16 great grandparents, 32 gg grandparents, 64 ggg grandparents, 128 ggg grandparents, 256 gggg grandparents, 512 ggggg grandparents, 1024 gggggg grandparents etc. etc. Many people will be ignorant about the exact ethnic background of ALL their ancestors going back just 200 years or so, let alone 500 years. People who do a thorough research of their family trees often express surprise at the degree of “foreign” lineage further down the line. As you already mention yourself interethnic unions are also pretty common in Cameroon. Because cultural identification in Africa is often only determined along parental or maternal lines distant ethnic mixing is quickly obscured after only a few generations.

      Having said all that i do think that DNA testing can provide valuable insights as long as you remain aware of the inherent limitations. You might be interested to know that i have blogged about the AncestryDNA results of two Cameroonians who, like you, are from the Northwest region. Doing a AncestryDNA test will not confirm your ethnic background but if you score in the 80-100% range for the socalled “Cameroon/Congo” region you will have a pretty solid confirmation of atleast your Northwest Cameroonian origins. Furthermore you will be linked to many DNA matches out of Ancestry.com client database. Naturally these will be mostly (African) Americans or other Afro-Diasporans, but possibily you will also receive a few DNA matches from Cameroon or Nigeria. Depending on the estimated genetic closeness with these DNA cousins they might provide further corroboration of your origins within Cameroon.

      Testing with either Ancestry.com or also 23andme or FTDNA will also allow you to download your DNA data and upload it into Gedmatch, a third party website which provides admixture analysis for free (just google for it and you will find numerous tutorials). Their socalled calculators can tell you more about your socalled “deep ancestry” admixture dating back from many centuries or even millennia ago. This will not be directly relevant for you, as this far surpasses the usual genealogical timeframe of around 500 years. Still it might be interesting. Through their Oracle feature they also report to you which sample groups from their (by default limited) databases show the greatest genetic affinity to your own DNA. This Oracle listing should not be taken as a measure of actual descent! Also do make sure to not take any of their ancestral category labeling or seemingly exact percentages too literally! This is a common “newbie” mistake which can lead to much confusion or even mislead you about your true origins. Again i am myself always cautious about the possibility of determining ethnicity through DNA testing. So if you’re going to do this i would advise you to take all results with a huge grain of salt. If you are able to correctly interpret the testresults, they can still be worthwhile though.

      Central & Southern African AncestryDNAResults (incl. 3 results from Cameroon, scroll down for it)

      GEDMATCH results of a Cameroonian (Babanki/Kedjom)

      A Gedmatch Admixture Guide!

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      • Thank you for your response. Honestly what you are saying is very true because those 3 tribes that are in my family culturally are very similar and to an outsider they would be indistinguishable. I think that the deep ancestral roots tests is what I am interested in to see if the oral tradition in my tribe is true that we migrated from the East. Thanks again!

        Liked by 1 persoon

  7. Hello.
    I’m Simone and I’m African American. I received my AncestryDNA results in October 2016 and it puzzles me a lot. I’m a beginner in my research of DNA overall. Many things that I’ve read so far on your page intrigues me and at the same time baffles me as I need more knowledge in order to have a complete understanding.
    I was hoping if you could help me shed some insights on my DNA results or advise on other resources that may be helpful.
    On Ancestry, I’m listed as 77% West African, Less than 2% Asian and 21% European (10 of the European is the Iberian Peninsula)
    What confuses me is my African estimated DNA results.
    Of the 77%, I’m 30% Mali – 25 Benin/Togo – 18% Cameroon/Congo.
    I have less than 1% of Ivory Coast/Ghana, African SE Bantu, Nigerian and Senegal.
    The more I try to research it and make sense of it all, it only leaves me with more questions which leads to totally being confused.

    Thanks in advance for any assistance you might be able to provice

    Like

    • Hello Simone,

      Your reaction to your DNA results is very common from what i can tell. I am curious to know what your expectations were prior to taking the AncestryDNA test. And also what exactly is it about the African breakdown which leaves you confused? The number of regions being mentioned or rather the specific regions themselves or something else?

      Like

  8. Hi and thank you for responding (and sorry for the earlier typos).

    As I’ve been studying DNA test results since receiving mine (and West African History), I had high hopes that I would be able to pinpoint at least one ethnic group that I could be certain that I belong to.

    When comparing my Mali 30% DNA marker to the typical person residing in Mali today (which is 39%) I thought I could say with certainty that I’m mostly Malian. However after more studying since October, it seems obvious (by historical accounts and AncestryDNA’s explanation that the other regions that share similar DNA with those from Mali are practically the opposite of mine. My DNA results showed that I’m less than 1% of those regions except for Cameroon Congo.

    Besides the puzzle of Mali’s admixture (learning of the regional wars between Ghana, Mali and later Songhai, intermarriages, borderlines imposed that sometimes split different ethnicities etc.,) It seems that I’m at a complete lost.

    Being 25% Benin/Togo and 18% Cameroon/Congo….I guess I thought (maybe more so hoping) that I had more Nigerian DNA than the less than 1% (which I understand is only a trace and could be attributed to background noise).

    I could go on and on about what I’ve learn about the history of Benin/Togo too but I guess my main comment or question is that I often see very low Mali percentages in others’ DNA. Mine seems high at 30%.

    Hope that answers your questions in more detail and is understandable.

    Thanks again!

    Liked by 1 persoon

    • Hi Simone,

      Sorry for taking a while to reply. Thanks for the clarification. Taking a DNA test can be a very valuable experience but will in many cases not give you the immediate and cristalclear answers you might have in mind. Instead it will take you on a journey of not only self-discovery but also learning about Africa’s and the Afro-Diaspora’s history, genetics, genealogy etc. I personally find this all very enriching but i have found out that you do have to make an effort to go for the ride 😉

      I have just finished a blog post which i think might be very useful to you. I would love for you to try out this tutorial and please also let me know if any African DNA matches show up for you. If you need any help don’t hesitate to ask!

      How to find those elusive African DNA matches on Ancestry

      African DNA cousins can deliver some of the much wanted specification you are looking for. Even when these individual matches will only cover a *single family line* out of potentially hundreds. So they won’t provide answers to all your questions about your *entire ancestry* which as i also mention in that post will be a composite of various origins from several African regions and ethnic groups.

      In fact even your 30% Mali could very well be traced back to more than just 1 country or ethnic group. That 30% is likely to represent about 15 to 40 individual ancestors. Some of them might have shared the exact same background but chances are high many instead were from neighbouring groups/areas rather (eventhough still genetically similar). Keep in mind that the African-born ancestors from whom you inherited this piece of DNA would mostly have been born in the 1700’s (if not earlier) at which time roughly speaking you might have had inbetween 64 and 256 ancestors. So their individual genetic contribution might be around 1% on average. If you happen to have any African-born ancestors from the early 1800’s this genetical inheritance might be higher but still won’t be more than around 5% in most cases.

      Having said that you do indeed have an exceptionally high socalled Mali score. Proportionally speaking it is about 39% of your African breakdown (30/77). In my survey of 350 AA AncestryDNA results i only came across 5 people with higher relative contributions! This Mali region is somewhat ambigious and sofar i have not come across any native African yet who had a predominant score for it. I have however observed socalled Mali scores in the 10-20% range for people all across Upper Guinea and in fact also Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso and Nigeria. So eventhough it is a distinctive region there’also a great deal of uncertainty when trying to pinpoint. Hopefully some of your African DNA maches can be helpful. What are your family’s state origins? It might be correlated with your above average Mali score although not per se.

      Your socalled “Nigeria” score on Ancestry is indeed rather low even when in fact many African Americans might score similar amounts. Keep in mind though that the labeling of ancestral categories is always to some degree arbitrary or imprecise. Actually you could still have a greater degree of Nigerian lineage but it might be “hiding” under your socalled “Benin/Togo” and “Cameroon/Congo” scores. Because Nigerians are so genetically diverse AncestryDNA needs these additional (and neighbouring) regions to describe Nigerian DNA.
      For more details see:
      Nigerian AncestryDNA results

      And also this page for your socalled “Benin/Togo” score
      Is “Benin/Togo” really pinpointing origins from within Benin’s borders?

      Like

  9. Your work is so eye opening. Thank you! My dad is Nigerian (Yoruba) & my mom black American….and I only got 12% Nigerian??😲😲 I was shocked and disappointed to be honest…my African Ancestry is 94% and is (Benin/Togo 26%, Cameroon/Congo 25%, Ivory Coast/ Ghana 22%, Nigeria 12%, Senegal 6%, Mali 1%)….5% European (Great Britain, Europe West) …..1% Pacific Islander ( Polynesia) any thoughts on the low percentage for Nigeria? My dad thought this meant I was not his daughter.

    *correction 2% Mali, <1% Africa South

    Liked by 1 persoon

    • Hi LeeLee, thanks for the compliment! Haha your father has no reason to worry! Many Yoruba actually score predominant socalled “Benin/Togo” amounts and rather low socalled “Nigeria”. If your father decides to also do the Ancestry test he might very well likewise score higher for “Benin/Togo” than for “Nigeria.” This outcome won’t mean he will have to give up his Nigerian citizenship 😉

      Rather it’s all to do with ancient migrations and genetic similarity across country borders which have only existed for about 130 years or so. This labeling can be confusing at first but if you keep in mind that the regions on AncestryDNA are meant to be proxies and estimates rather anything super exact it will enhance your understanding. You can read more about it on this page:

      Nigerian AncestryDNA results

      Also check out this Youtube video done by a Yoruba/Edo woman who scored 55% socalled “Benin/Togo” and only 35% socalled “Nigeria”. This video is also done by a Nigerian with an unexpectedly high Benin/Togo score (66%), he’s not Yoruba but it’s still very insightful and funny!

      Like

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