African DNA Cousins reported for people across the Diaspora

This blog post features the AncestryDNA results of 8 persons from 7 different countries. In particular i will list the (most likely) African DNA matches i was able to find for each profile. Using the tutorial i blogged about in my previous blog post:

Naturally this overview is not meant to be representative per se because these persons are in the first place individuals with unique family trees. It is mainly to show the variation across the Afro-Diaspora. Nonetheless I strongly suspect that many patterns to be observed will still be valid as well for other people of the same nationality or ethnic (sub)group.

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Diaspora Overview

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For this overview I specifically chose people with one single predominant African regional score on AncestryDNA. In order to see how Ancestry’s “Ethnicity Estimate” lines up with predicted African DNA matches. More detailed analysis will follow in this blog post. If you continue reading you will also come across a section featuring inspiring stories of people who were able to reconnect with their African kin through DNA testing.

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How to find those elusive African DNA matches on Ancestry

Zoom in Gambia

Ethnicity summary of my most likely Gambian DNA match on Ancestry.com

Gambia Match

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A couple of months ago i found my very first mainland West African DNA cousin on Ancestry.com. Judging from his name and ethnicity preview he is a Mandinga from Gambia. I was exhilarated!  I had never been able to find a mainland West African match before. Even when i took my first DNA test with 23andme already in 2010! In other words I had to wait seven years for it! Inspite that i haven’t had any meaningful contact yet this genetic connection is still very valuable to me. As I am of Cape Verdean descent this finding seems very appropriate and in line with my primary Upper Guinean roots (see Top 20 Ethnic Roots for Cape Verdeans).

Many people seeking to trace back their African ancestors are very eager to be connected to a specific place and person within Africa. They hope to achieve this by finding a DNA match from the continent. But just like me they are having a hard time to do so. In the beginning this was mostly because only very few Africans were included in the customer databases of companies such as 23andme or Ancestry.com. Fortunately this has been changing lately because a quickly growing number of Africans or rather African migrants and their children are taking a DNA test. This increases the likelyhood of receiving African DNA matches. However many people still find it difficult and/or tedious to sort out their DNA matches. In this blog post i will therefore describe a method which enables a systematic, comprehensive and time saving detection of your “100% African” DNA matches on Ancestry.com.

If you continue reading you will find:

  • Some considerations on how to interpret your African DNA matches
  • A step by step tutorial on how to sort out your African DNA matches

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Virgin Islands Roots

Already old news apparently but just came across this as i finished my series on Caribbean slave registers 🙂

Caribbean Slave Records on Ancestry.com

There’s also this wonderful website, Virgin Islands Roots, too bad i can’t seem to find any summarized findings on slave ethnicity for Virgin Islanders based on this data. If you read the article i linked to above they also mention how they were able to trace back the Senegalese ancestor for someone who now lives in the USA. It’s an amazing story of which i found a more detailed version via this source (page 7) :

VENUS JOHANNES – A WOMAN FROM SENEGAL ON ST. CROIX 

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Fictional Family Tree incl. African Born Ancestors

familytree

Fair warning in advance: this whole post is just meant as an eloborate thought experiment. Let’s imagine that somehow for a fictional Afro-Diasporan we ARE able to trace back and identify the ethnic origins of ALL of his African born ancestors for the last 7 generations. How would that look like on paper?  And what does it imply for anyone in the real world who’s faced with a missing paper trail in most cases and usually in need of tons of luck and perseverance to even identify 1 single African ancestor? Lees verder